Blog

The Red Line Extension That Never Was

Patrick Sullivan | January 30, 2015

The Red Line has the highest ridership of any of the MBTA’s rail lines. Stretching North to South from North Cambridge through Downtown Boston and then branching off into Mattapan and Braintree, nearly 273,000 daily unlinked trips are taken on the Red Line’s 21 route miles. The Red Line was the last of the four subway lines to open, with service between Harvard Square and Park Street commencing in 1912. Since 1912 the Red Line has been extended many times, with the most recent expansion coming in 1985 with the opening of the line's northern terminus, Alewife Station. The story of the Red…
Transportation Relics (and a road that goes nowhere)

Patrick Sullivan | October 24, 2014

Whether on a walk through the woods or a walk through the heart of the city, it’s not uncommon to stumble upon a relic of the past. The archeological ruins of a time before us. All over New England you can find freestanding stone walls built hundreds of years ago still curiously standing along the edge of a field or along a highway. In Boston, it's not uncommon to find old cobblestone footpaths or streetcar tracks visible beneath layers of battered urban pavement. These are reminders of those who lived in our places before us; those who built the first…
Ridesharing: Then and Now

Patrick Sullivan | September 4, 2014

Uber. Lyft. Sidecar. Ridejoy. Hitch. RidesScout. Carma. These are the ridesharing apps that I can think of off the top of my head. Ridesharing (or Transportation Network) apps have become a hot (and controversial) technology that are helping to drive the explosive growth of the sharing economy. Entrepreneurs on both coasts are looking for innovative new ways to disrupt the traditional ways in which we commute. From UberX, which turns anyone’s car into a taxi, to CarmaHop, a modern take on hitchhiking, new technology is pushing us to rethinking the relationship between a car, a driver, and a passenger. For some commuters, ridesharing…
GPS Watch – 1920’s Style

Patrick Sullivan | June 5, 2014

GPS technology can be found virtually everywhere – our smart phones, our cars, our eyeglasses, and even in our watches. Over the last couple years smart watches have become more ubiquitous and increasingly more powerful. Hikers and runners have been using GPS equipped watches for over a decade, and now more dynamic watches have to ability to track users sleep patterns, stress levels, and combined with smartphone apps can act like small computers strapped to your wrist. Dick Tracywas really on to something. Let's get back to the idea of using a watch as a navigation tool.  The idea of a watch providing…
“America’s Technology Highway”

Patrick Sullivan | April 17, 2014

Route 128, the circumferential highway that rings the Greater Boston area, is known by many as “America’s Technology Highway.” Driving along the highway and observing the names of the corporations that line the corridor today, it’s clear how many major high-tech and biotech companies have a major presence along the highway. But how did Route 128 originally acquire this coveted designation? Because before Silicon Valley and before Kendall Square became the hubs of innovation that they are today, the Route 128 corridor was the center of technological innovation in America. To meet demand for better access to the growing suburbs…